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Copyright

Information about respecting Canadian copyright law in your work at Centennial.

Introduction

This page contains frequently asked questions about respecting copyright, and will be updated as new questions arise.

Have a question not answered here? Please contact us!

Internet sources

Can I share an image from Wikipedia with students on eCentennial?

Usually yes, but check the copyright status and usage permissions.

For example, you might want to use this image of the Mona Lisa for your class. You can find image permissions on Wikipedia by clicking on the image and pressing the "More details" button, then scrolling down to the Permissions section. In this case, the original painting has entered the public domain in most countries, including Canada and the United States, and moreover Wikipedia's position is that "faithful reproductions of two-dimensional public domain works of art are public domain".

However, this interpretation is not accepted everywhere, so we should visit the website for the Louvre, where the photo was originally posted. The Louvre’s legal information and terms of use state that “non-commercial re-use is authorized, provided the source and author are acknowledged”, which gives you the permission you need. You should use the publisher's preferred citation of “© RMN/Grand-Palais (musée de Louvre) / Michel Urtado”.

Learning how to respect image copyright can seem daunting at first, but once you learn the basics you will find that it does not take long.

Can I reproduce charts and tables from Statistics Canada for my students? I want to show them in a PowerPoint presentation, distribute them as handouts in class, and post them to eCentennial.

Usually yes, but check whether the materials are restricted.

The Statistics Canada copyright notice includes an open licence agreement, which permits you to share most data with your students as long as you acknowledge the source. You should also check for any data excluded from the agreement and respect the preferred citation format.

Can I share materials published by Government of Canada websites?

You must request permission.

Canadian government documents are governed by a special concept called Crown copyright. Until November 2013, non-commercial sharing of most Crown copyrighted works was permitted, but now each department or agency sets its own copyright policy. The Crown copyright and licensing website includes a list of copyright contacts for these departments and agencies. Please contact us to seek clearance.

Can I share materials published by U.S. government websites?

Yes, with some exceptions.

Most government publications of the United States are not copyright-protected, but please consult the government works website for more information, including exceptions.

Can I post images published under a Creative Commons licence to eCentennial?

Yes, but check the usage permissions if you need to adapt.

There are many different Creative Commons licences, but every licence permits non-commercial sharing without adaptation, and some allow additional uses. Find usage permissions just below images or by following links to additional information. Please contact us if you have additional questions or concerns.

Creative Commons offers a meta-search feature that searches websites like Google Images and Flickr from one search bar, and includes filters for adaptation and commercial use.

Print sources

Can I make copies of a public domain photograph that has been published in a book?

Treat the photograph like the book where it appears.

The photograph has entered the public domain, but if the book where it appears is still copyright-protected, you must seek permission to use the image. However, the Centennial College Fair Dealing Policy for Copyright-Protected Work permits you to share one image per work without seeking permission from copyright holders. If you need to share more than one image per work, additional permissions may be required, so please contact us to seek clearance.

How many drawings from a print book can I scan and upload to eCentennial?

You can share one image from a work that contains multiple artistic works.

The Centennial College Fair Dealing Policy for Copyright-Protected Work permits you to share one image per work without seeking permission from copyright holders. If you need to share more than one image per work, additional permissions may be required, so please contact us to seek clearance.

Database sources

Can I share a photograph from an database with my students?

Check the licensing terms. 

Every database subscription uses different licensing terms: some allow uploading works to eCentennial and including them in course packs, but others do not. Please consult CLEAR, Centennial’s licence permissions database, to learn how you can share licensed content with your students.

Can I share multiple charts or graphs from an article with my students?

Check the licensing terms.

Every database subscription uses different licensing terms: some allow uploading works to eCentennial and including them in course packs, but others do not. Please consult CLEAR, Centennial’s licence permissions database, to learn how you can share licensed content with your students.

Sharing more than one image per work, including mulitple charts or graphs, exceeds the limits of the Centennial College Fair Dealing Policy for Copyright-Protected Work. If you need to share more than one image per work, please contact us to seek clearance.

Where can I find databases of images to share with my students?

From the library website, navigate to E-Resources, and underneath E-Resources by Type, click Images.

Requesting permission

When database terms do not permit your proposed copying or you need to copy beyond the limits of the Centennial College Fair Dealing Policy for Copyright-Protected Work, contact the copyright team.

Citation Help

Creating proper citations for your work can seem daunting, but the library has resources to answer your questions!

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